Bunyip: An Ocker Shocker

It’s about time someone made a cryptozoological creature feature starring a uniquely Aussie monster like the Bunyip — that large critter from Aboriginal mythology who enjoys spending his time splashing about in billabongs (the swampy variety, not the boardshorts).

Well, that’s just what co-directors Miri Stone and Denby Weller and their crew are doing:

bunyip-poster

Synopsis:

When a team-building hike strays into the territory of an unknown Australian predator, this group of tech-savvy, thrill seeking city folk will discover that some legends have teeth…

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The production process — made possible by a successful Pozible crowd-sourcing campaign — was thoroughly documented on the movie’s blog and Facebook page. It involves location shoots in various scenic places in New South Wales, perilous rock-climbing, cast wrangling, fear, elation … and even a zombiroo….

Meanwhile, here are some concept/proposal drawings for the Bunyip:

bunyip03 bunyip02 bunyip01

I guess we have to wait for the movie to be released to see the genuine article.

Screenshots:

bunyip04 bunyip05 bunyip06 bunyip07 bunyip08 bunyip09

Looks good!

Source: Via Avery Guerra. Check out the official website.

This entry was posted in Australian, Cryptozoology, Film, Horror, Independent film, Monsters in general and tagged , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

3 Responses to Bunyip: An Ocker Shocker

  1. brrt says:

    why are you using nerf guns you triumphant battlers

  2. Corinne Adams says:

    I use to watch a child’s cartoon show out of Philadelphia 50 years ago, “Bernie the Bunyip”. He was sweet and slick, like a black sock puppet with a seal head. Anyone that saw it likes (and trusts) Bunyips! Now we get that they’re nasty. I don’t think so!

  3. Robert Hood says:

    Corinne, I think you mean Bertie the Bunyip. I’ve never seen the show, but the mythology of the Bunyip gives plenty of reasons for seeing it as a monstrous creature. The word “bunyip” is generally translated by Aboriginals as “devil” or “evil spirit” (according to Wikipedia). At any rate, most of the old colonial stories depict them as dangerous. Check this picture from 1890: http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/a/a8/Bunyip_1890.jpg

    Anyway, I reckon Bertie/Bernie may have been pulling the wool over children’s eyes!

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